The Most Impressive Natural Parks and Reserves in the World

The Most Impressive Natural Parks and Reserves in the World

Visiting the world’s most amazing national parks is probably the best way to see how incredibly beautiful our planet is. We must be grateful to the governments for the fact that most of the most beautiful corners of the nature are protected, and human activities are restricted there. According to the World Conservation Organization, there are more than 6500 national parks. They are all valuable and exceptional, protecting both the unique landscapes and wildlife.

Namibo – Naukluft National Park, Namibia

The hot sand of Namibo-Naukluft National Park is a perfect stretch of uninhabited desert. The biggest attraction of the reserve is the Sossusvlei dunes. It is believed to be the oldest sand dunes in the world, made by the powerful winds of these deserts, which have shaped the landscape of the area for centuries. The most popular way to get to know this reserve is to travel by hot air balloon. Seen from above, this undulating desert looks almost like an orange ocean. Another way to explore this national park is to rent a jeep. If you do not manage to see everything during the day, you can stay overnight at local campsites.

Mungo National Park, Australia

Over the past few decades, even a few areas in remote parts of Australia have been added to the list of places that travelers must see such as Alice Springs, the Blue Mountains and Uluru. Mungo National Park has finally received the proper attention. Surrounded by clay hills known as the Chinese Walls this nature reserve is a hint of a rich history of ancient lakes and wandering species. The remains of the skeletons found here prove that people lived in the area of the current reserve 40,000 years ago. However, these deserts have long been completely abandoned.

Mungo National Park, Australia
Mungo National Park, Australia

Northeast Greenland National Park, Greenland

In an age of concern about pollution and melting glaciers, Greenland National Park is proof that not all the glaciers have melted yet. The largest national park in the world, occupying an area equivalent to double France, is a region untouched by civilization. The small town of Ittoqqortoormiit is an unofficial gateway to a quiet kingdom of ice and frost. Currently, only scientists and extreme adventure lovers are allowed to visit this place. Excursions are flown by plane or helicopter and only with special national permits.

Tongariro National Park, New Zealand

Just after 10 seconds spend in Tongariro National Park, it is easy to find out why Peter Jackson chose this region as the background for his epic trilogy The Lord of the Rings. The three sleeping volcanoes in the park, captured in these movies, rise above the cold clear water of Lake Taupo. Today, as the wave of tourism for movie enthusiasts has subsided, New Zealand’s oldest national park has once again become a realm of geological anomalies. The accent of the extraterrestrial Tongariro landscapes the so-called Moon Craters is a stretch of steamy bubbling mud and smoking craters.

Tongariro National Park, New Zealand
Tongariro National Park, New Zealand